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THE NEW JEWISH HOME NEWS AND PRESS

Press Release: Jewish Home Signs Lease for “Extraordinary” New Adult Day Services Center in Bronx

Simone Development Signs The New Jewish Home to a New Lease for Adult Day Services at Hutch Metro Center in the Bronx

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The New Jewish Home Lease at 1200 Waters Place Totals Nearly 50,000 SF

(BRONX, NYMay 31, 2017)Simone Development Companies has signed a new lease with The New Jewish Home, one of the nation’s largest and most diversified not-for-profit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, totaling 49,739 square feet of office and adult day services space at 1200 Waters Place at the Hutchinson Metro Center in the Bronx.

Continue Reading Press Release: Jewish Home Signs Lease for “Extraordinary” New Adult Day Services Center in Bronx

Mount Sinai and The New Jewish Home Expand Collaboration

(NEW YORK — May 15, 2017) The Mount Sinai Health System and The New Jewish Home are continuing their expansion of services to improve the care of hospitalized patients who require specialized post-acute or long-term care at a skilled nursing facility after leaving the hospital. Through the Mount Sinai-New Jewish Home Hospitalist Program, Mount Sinai doctors specializing in hospital care (known as hospitalists) will provide a seamless transition for patients who need nursing care at The New Jewish Home.

Continue Reading Mount Sinai and The New Jewish Home Expand Collaboration

Audrey Weiner to Retire as President & CEO of The New Jewish Home

Dr. Weiner will stay on part-time to lead implementation of the organization’s Manhattan Master Plan

Project will bring the pioneering green house model of nursing home care to NEW YORK CITY

(APRIL 10, 2017 – NEW YORK, NY)  Audrey Weiner, DSW, MPH, will retire as President and CEO of The New Jewish Home (Jewish Home), a post she has held since 2002, it was announced today by Board Chair Michael Luskin. The effective date of Dr. Weiner’s retirement is December 31, 2017.  Dr. Weiner joined Jewish Home, one of the country’s largest and most diversified not‐for‐profit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, in 1993 as Administrator for its Westchester campus.

Continue Reading Audrey Weiner to Retire as President & CEO of The New Jewish Home

The New Jewish Home Welcomes Board Chair Michael Luskin

NEW YORK NY: January 9, 2016 — The New Jewish Home, one of the nation’s largest and most diversified nonprofit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, welcomes its new board chair, Michael Luskin. Mr. Luskin, who assumed his position on January 1, 2017, succeeds Elizabeth Grayer, the chair since 2012. He has been a director of The New Jewish Home since 1996.

Mr. Luskin is a partner at the New York law firm of Luskin, Stern & Eisler LLP and a bankruptcy expert who represents financial institutions and other parties in State and federal courts around the country. He is a Fellow of the American College of Bankruptcy and Co-Chair of the Creditors’ Rights and Bankruptcy Litigation Committee of the Commercial and Federal Litigation Section of the New York State Bar Association, and has been recognized as a leading bankruptcy lawyer by Chambers USA: America’s Leading Lawyers for Business each year since 2001.

In addition to his involvement with The New Jewish Home, Mr. Luskin is active in the Lawyers Division of UJA-Federation of New York; is a founding director of CitySquash, an urban enrichment program in The Bronx and Brooklyn; and serves on his college and law school class committees.

Mr. Luskin received his JD from Harvard Law School and his BA from Harvard College, from which he graduated magna cum laude. He lives in Scarsdale with his wife, retired pediatrician Judith Luskin. They have two grown daughters, three grandchildren, and two Welsh springer spaniels.

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About THE NEW JEWISH HOME:  Serving New Yorkers of all faiths and ethnicities for 168 years, The New Jewish Home is transforming eldercare as we know it. One of the nation’s largest and most diversified not‐for‐profit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, Jewish Home serves 12,000 older adults each year, in their homes and on campuses in Manhattan and Westchester, through short-term rehabilitation, long‐term skilled nursing, low-income housing, and a wide range of home health programs. Jewish Home believes that high quality care and personal dignity are everyone’s right, regardless of background or economic circumstances. Technology, innovation, applied research and new models of care put The New Jewish Home at the vanguard of eldercare providers across the country. For more information, visit www.jewishhome.org.

The New Jewish Home Partners with ReServe to Offer Dementia Care Navigation Services

Navigators will connect rehab patients to services and support at home

NEW YORK, NY: December 5, 2016 — The New Jewish Home (formerly, Jewish Home Lifecare), a lreserve-logoeading New York-area geriatric care system, is partnering with ReServe, a nonprofit that matches professionals 55 and older with organizations that can benefit from their expertise, to provide dementia care navigation services to rehabilitation patients as they prepare for discharge from Jewish Home and for three months afterwards.

Navigators will be trained by ReServe and then assigned to Jewish Home rehabilitation (post-acute) patients living with dementia. Once home, each patient or designated family member will get a check-in call from the patient’s navigator at least once a week as well as two home visits during the three months. To date, three navigators have completed training and begun working with Jewish Home patients.

IN THE NEWS: (“Senior Care Providers Plug Workforce Gaps with Older Adults’ Help,” Senior Housing News, December 2016) “The model is around dementia care and is a care coaching model,” says ReServe’s Traynor. ReServists who have worked in health care for their entire career seem to be able to connect with the older patients in partner organizations, because they are working with someone who is not that much older or younger than themselves, she adds.

“With people living longer, and more and more of us opting to ‘age in place’ at home, the need for health care professionals who can connect patients to home- and community-based services has become greater than ever before,” said Audrey Weiner, president and CEO of The New Jewish Home. “With their deep well of life and professional experience, the members of ReServe are ideally suited to this role.”

Said Christine McMahon, president and CEO of ReServe: “We’re excited to begin this partnership with The New Jewish Home, which has a long history of innovation in elder care. We are like-minded in our goal to transform community-based care for older adults and we know that our dementia care coaches have the skills, experience and passion to make a difference.”

Dementia care navigators counsel individuals, and the families of individuals, who have received a dementia diagnosis. Navigators connect them to resources, guide them in their decision-making, and provide them with help and hope. Navigators make patients and their families aware of both services that may be covered by insurance, such as home health aides, telemedicine, and various kinds of therapy, and publicly funded services like Access-a-Ride. Navigators also help resolve safety issues and navigate legal and financial issues.

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About THE NEW JEWISH HOME:  Serving New Yorkers of all faiths and ethnicities for 168 years, The New Jewish Home (formerly, Jewish Home Lifecare) is transforming eldercare as we know it. One of the nation’s largest and most diversified not‐for‐profit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, Jewish Home serves 12,000 older adults each year in their homes and on two campuses through short-term rehabilitation, long‐term skilled nursing, low-income housing, and a wide range of home health programs. Jewish Home believes that high quality care and personal dignity are everyone’s right, regardless of background or economic circumstances. Technology, innovation, applied research and new models of care put The New Jewish Home at the vanguard of eldercare providers across the country. For more information, visit www.jewishhome.org.

 About ReSERVE:  ReServe is an innovative national nonprofit headquartered in New York City that matches continuing professionals age 55+ (ReServists) with organizations that need their expertise to fill staffing needs, to expand educational and health care efforts and to fight poverty. Nonprofits and public agencies (Partners) can tap into a lifetime of experience to fill crucial staffing gaps at affordable rates. ReServists are making a tremendous difference around the country, leveraging their talent, skills and expertise to make measurable impact.  ReServists work on a part-time basis in exchange for a modest hourly stipend. For more information, visit www.reserveinc.org.

The New Jewish Home wins $400,000 N.I.H. grant to study innovative approach to reducing delirium in nursing homes

NEW YORK, NY: September 23, 2016 — The National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded The New Jewish Home $400,000 to study an innovative approach to reducing delirium, and the resulting hospitalizations and fatalities, among nursing home patients.

The grant will fund a two-year, 306-person pilot that starts this month. Dr. Kenneth Boockvar of The New Jewish Home’s research arm, The Research Institute on Aging, will lead the study.

While studies exist on ways to reduce delirium in hospital settings little research has been done on how to reduce the condition in long-term care settings. The numbers involved are staggering. Of adults over 75, 17.5%, or 1.4 million people, are patients at the nation’s 15,000 nursing homes. As many as 23% show signs of delirium when they are admitted and 33% experience delirium during their stay.

The protocol being tested in The New Jewish Home study has the potential to yield significant savings in Medicare and Medicaid costs. For example, a nursing home intervention that reduced patient hospitalizations by 17% would result in a national savings in hospital costs of $1.9 billion annually.

The centerpiece of The New Jewish Home’s study is an intervention model called the Hospital Elder Life Program for Long-term Care, or HELP-LTC. Developed by Dr. Boockvar and his team, HELP-LTC is based on the pioneering HELP program for hospital patients created by Dr. Sharon Inouye, Director of the Aging Brain Center at Boston’s Institute for Aging Research, who is assisting Dr. Boockvar on the Jewish Home study. HELP-LTC standardizes procedures and training for treating nursing home patients at risk of delirium, such as those with acute medical conditions and those with dementia or other cognitive impairments.

Caring for patients in the HELP-LTC model is a multidisciplinary team comprising a specially trained certified nursing assistant (CNA), a geriatrician, and the patient’s primary care physician and nurses. The team monitors the patients and delivers preventative care, such as orientation and memory activities (to maintain cognitive function), water and snacks (to maintain hydration and nutrition), and daily exercise (to maintain mobility).

The new study builds on an earlier one with promising results conducted by Dr. Boockvar at The New Jewish Home. Published in the May 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatric Society, the study showed that of 143 patients who received a HELP-LTC intervention, 13% were hospitalized compared to 24% in the control group, and 11% died compared to 15% in the control group.

Traumatic for those who experience it and challenging for their health care providers, delirium is a widespread phenomenon affecting roughly 33% of older adults in both hospital and long-term care settings. It can be triggered by a variety of factors, including immobility, dehydration, poor nutrition, lack of sleep, and medication issues. The condition is characterized by hallucinations, disorientation, reduced alertness, and disrupted thinking, and many of those who develop delirium never regain their pre-delirium levels of cognition and are thus never able to return home.

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ABOUT THE NEW JEWISH HOME:  Serving New Yorkers of all faiths and ethnicities for almost 170 years, The New Jewish Home (formerly, Jewish Home Lifecare) is transforming eldercare as we know it. One of the nation’s largest and most diversified not‐for‐profit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, The New Jewish Home serves 12,000 older adults each year, in their homes and on campuses in Manhattan and Westchester, through short-term rehabilitation, long‐term skilled nursing, low-income housing, and a wide range of home health programs. The New Jewish Home believes that high-quality care and personal dignity are everyone’s right, regardless of background or economic circumstance. Technology, innovation, applied research and new models of care put The New Jewish Home in the vanguard of eldercare providers across the country. For more information, visit www.jewishhome.org.

The New Jewish Home Welcomes New Chief Operating Officer, Names Chief Financial Officer and General Counsel

Also: New Leadership for Westchester Campus.

May 11, 2016

The New Jewish Home, one of the nation’s largest and most diversified nonprofit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, announces several appointments to its executive management team and to senior positions at its Westchester campus, the Sarah Neuman facility in Mamaroneck. The arrivals include Jacob Victory, Chief Operating Officer; Elliot Hagler and Gabrielle Genauer, who move into the newly created positions of Chief Financial Officer and Vice President – General Counsel, respectively; and Sandra Mundy, who has been promoted to Administrator of Sarah Neuman.

Departing are Tom Gilmartin, who is stepping down after 10 years as Chief Operating Officer, and Rita Morgan, who is retiring after 27 years in senior positions, mostly recently as Interim Administrator at Sarah Neuman.

Additions to Executive Management Team

As Chief Operating Officer of The New Jewish Home, JACOB VICTORY will oversee three major areas of operation that together serve 10,000 New York elders and almost 85 percent of Jewish Home’s clientele: (1) the 1,200-person Community Services division, which cares for 9,000 older adults in their homes through a certified home health agency (CHHA); Home Assistance Personnel Inc. (HAPI), a health aide service; Solutions-at-Home, a geriatric care-management service; and a telemedicine unit, which employs technological innovations to monitor and care for elders living at home; (2) two nursing homes, on the Manhattan and Westchester campuses, which provide long-term care for 900 residents; and (3) four Bronx residences for low-income elders — three “Section 202” residences and one assisted-living residence — which provide housing for 300 elders.

Mr. Victory comes to The New Jewish Home from Health Republic Insurance of New York, where he was Senior Vice President of Strategy. He has held positions in operations, performance management, and program development at New York’s CenterLight Healthcare, the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Mr. Victory holds an MPA in Health Finance from New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. He replaces Tom Gilmartin, who has stepped down after 10 years of service.

ELLIOT HAGLER, CPA, has been named Chief Financial Officer, responsible for Finance, Information Technology, and Materials Management. Before joining Jewish Home, he spent more than a decade at Lighthouse Guild International, most recently as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. He holds a BA in economics from the City University of New York.

GABRIELLE GENAUER has joined the staff as Vice President – General Counsel, responsible for all legal affairs, including compliance. Ms. Genauer comes to Jewish Home from the Wall Street law firm of Hughes Hubbard & Reed, LLP, where she has spent almost a decade counseling clients on litigation strategy, risk management and compliance. She earned a JD from the University of Pennsylvania Law School and a BS from Cornell University.

New Leadership at Sarah Neuman in Mamaroneck

The New Jewish Home has named SANDRA MUNDY, LMSW, NHA, to the senior-most position at Sarah Neuman, that of Administrator. Ms. Mundy previously spent two years as Associate Administrator of the Bronx campus. She replaces Rita Morgan, who is retiring after 27 dedicated years of service.

Ms. Mundy will oversee a 300-bed facility whose 450-person staff cares for 1,000 elders each year through short-term rehabilitation, long-term nursing, and a day center. Ms. Mundy will also be responsible for Sarah Neuman’s various special programs, including Westchester’s first overnight respite program for people living with Alzheimer’s and other forms of severe dementia, and first elder residences, known as the Small Houses, based on the groundbreaking Green House Project® model of long-term care.

Before joining Jewish Home in 2014, Ms. Mundy spent 11 years as Assistant Administrator for Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement at the Newark Extended Care Facility in New Jersey. She earned both an MSW from New York University and a BA from the State University of New York at Albany.

OLIVIA BABOL-IBE, RNC, BSN, MSN, has been named Director of Nursing at Sarah Neuman after serving as Director of Nursing on the Bronx campus. She brings with her more than 30 years’ experience that includes senior positions at the Schervier Nursing Care Center, part of the Bon Secours New York Health System; the Hebrew Home at Riverdale, and New Rochelle’s Dumont Masonic Home. Ms. Babol-Ibe is Chairperson of the LeadingAge New York Downstate Council of Nursing Directors and holds a BSN from Velez College, Philippines and an MSN from Silliman University in Dumaguete City, Philippines.

CHRISTINA GIARRATANO, LMSW, rejoins The New Jewish Home as Sarah Neuman’s Director of Social Work after a brief hiatus as Director of Social Work at the Methodist Home for Nursing and Rehabilitation in The Bronx. She holds an MSW from Columbia University School of Social Work and a BA from Hunter College.

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About THE NEW JEWISH HOME:  Serving New Yorkers of all faiths and ethnicities for 168 years, The New Jewish Home is transforming eldercare as we know it. One of the nation’s largest and most diversified not‐for‐profit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, Jewish Home serves 12,000 older adults each year, in their homes and on three campuses, through short-term rehabilitation, long‐term skilled nursing, low-income housing, and a wide range of home health programs. Jewish Home believes that high quality care and personal dignity are everyone’s right, regardless of background or economic circumstances. Technology, innovation, applied research and new models of care put The New Jewish Home at the vanguard of eldercare providers across the country. For more information, visit www.jewishhome.org.

Sarah Mundy Assumes Top Post at Jewish Home’s Sarah Neuman Center

ALSO: New Directors of Nursing and Social Work 

MAMARONECK, NY: May 11, 2016 — The New Jewish Home, one of the nation’s largest and most diversified nonprofit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, has named Sandra Mundy, LMSW, NHA, Administrator of its Westchester campus, the Sarah Neuman Center in Mamaroneck. In this top position she replaces Rita Morgan, who is retiring after 27 years of service, most recently as Interim Administrator at Sarah Neuman. Olivia Babol-Ibe, RNC, BSN, MSN, and Christina Giarratano, LMSW, have been named Director Nursing and Director of Social Work, respectively.

Ms. Mundy and Ms. Babol-Ibe come to Sarah Neuman from Jewish Home’s Bronx campus, where they were Associate Administrator and Director of Nursing, respectively. Christina Giarratano rejoins Jewish Home after a brief hiatus as Director of Social Work at the Methodist Home for Nursing and Rehabilitation in The Bronx.

As Administrator of the Sarah Neuman Center, Sandra Mundy will hold the senior-most position on Jewish Home’s Westchester campus. She will oversee a 300-bed facility whose 450-person staff cares for 1,000 elders each year through short-term rehabilitation, long-term nursing, and a day center. Ms. Mundy will also be responsible for Sarah Neuman’s various special programs, including Westchester’s first overnight respite program for people living with Alzheimer’s and other forms of severe dementia, and first elder residences, known as the Small Houses, based on the groundbreaking Green House Project® model of long-term care.

Before joining Jewish Home in 2014, Ms. Mundy spent 11 years as Assistant Administrator for Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement at the Newark Extended Care Facility in New Jersey. She earned both an MSW from New York University and a BA from the State University of New York at Albany.

Director of Nursing Olivia Babol-Ibe brings with her more than 30 years’ experience that includes senior positions at the Schervier Nursing Care Center, part of the Bon Secours New York Health System; the Hebrew Home at Riverdale, and New Rochelle’s Dumont Masonic Home. Ms. Babol-Ibe is Chairperson of the LeadingAge New York Downstate Council of Nursing Directors and holds a BSN from Velez College, Philippines and an MSN from Silliman University in Dumaguete City, Philippines.

Director of Social Work Christina Giarratano holds an MSW from Columbia University School of Social Work and a BA from Hunter College.

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About the SARAH NEUMAN CENTER: Mamaroneck’s Sarah Neuman Center, part of The New Jewish Home, one of the country’s largest and most diversified geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, plays an important role in caring for the most frail and vulnerable elders in Larchmont, Mamaroneck and the surrounding area. The 450-person staff of health care professionals provides gentle, thoughtful, expert care for 1,100 elders each year. They include 300 adults who live at the five-and-a-half-acre campus full-time, are undergoing short-term post-surgery rehabilitation, or are recovering from a serious illness. The Center, which is known for its expertise in caring for seniors with Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia, also offers a day center and the popular Home Away from Home respite program for older caregivers in need of a break from the 24/7 stress of caring for a loved one with severe physical and/or psychological challenges. For more information, visit www.sarahneuman.org.

About THE NEW JEWISH HOME:  Serving New Yorkers of all faiths and ethnicities for 168 years, The New Jewish Home is transforming eldercare as we know it. One of the nation’s largest and most diversified not‐for‐profit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, Jewish Home serves 12,000 older adults each year, in their homes and on three campuses, through short-term rehabilitation, long‐term skilled nursing, low-income housing, and a wide range of home health programs. Jewish Home believes that high quality care and personal dignity are everyone’s right, regardless of background or economic circumstances. Technology, innovation, applied research and new models of care put The New Jewish Home at the vanguard of eldercare providers across the country. For more information, visit www.jewishhome.org.

Age-Friendly NYC Commission to be co-chaired by Dr. Audrey Weiner, President and CEO, The New Jewish Home

September 8, 2015

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today that the 2015 Age-Friendly NYC Commission will be co-chaired by President and CEO of The New Jewish Home, Dr. Audrey Weiner. Her fellow co-chair will be Edward Lewis, co-Founder of Essence Communications.

The Commission grew organically from Age Friendly NYC which was launched in 2007 as a partnership between the Mayor’s Office, the NYC City Council and the The New York Academy of Medicine. Age-Friendly NYC works closely with City government, businesses, and non-profit sectors, to assure the City is addressing the challenges and leveraging the opportunities posed by a rapidly increasingly population of older New Yorkers in four major areas: community and civic participation, housing, public spaces and transportation, and health and social services.

The Commission is charged with monitoring Age-Friendly NYC’s commitments, identifying best and innovative policies and programs, and providing dynamic and innovative leadership to engage the private and non-profit sectors in changing the culture of New York City to become more inclusive of older people.

Said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “With the seating of the Age-Friendly NYC Commission, new members will continue this legacy and also identify more opportunities that will make our City into a healthier, safer and more active place in which to grow older.”

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Geriatrics Career Development Program Graduates Largest Class

gcdgradaltThe New Jewish Home celebrated the graduation of the seventh class of students in our Geriatrics Career Development program in June. The 2015 class was the largest ever, with 67 New York high school students from under-resourced schools having completed the rigorous program of career training and college preparation.

The 2015 class of Jewish Home’s Geriatrics Career Development Program has much to be proud of, including:

  • 99% applied to college
  • 93% were accepted to college
  • Students have been offered scholarships totaling $1,277,500
  • 92% earned an Allied Health Profession certificate; 48 are now CNAs, 8 are certified Medical Coders and 30 are enrolled in a Patient Care Technician course.